Previous Commonwealth Games

SHARING OUR COMMONWEALTH GAMES HISTORY

The Commonwealth Games are to Canada what the Olympic Games are to Greece as the first Commonwealth Games were held in 1930 in Hamilton, Ontario.

Bobby RobinsonBobby Robinson, a major influence within athletics in Canada at the time, finally implemented the event that had been talked about amongst Commonwealth nations for over thirty years. Eleven countries with 400 athletes in total participated in the first Commonwealth Games. $30,000 was provided by the City of Hamilton to these nations to help cover travelling costs. Since then, the Games have been conducted every four years, except for 1942 and 1946, due to World War II and have grown from 400 athletes to more than 4,000.
 
From 1930 to 1950 the Games were known as the British Empire Games, then the British Empire and Commonwealth Games until 1962. From 1966 to 1974 they took on the title of British Commonwealth Games and from 1978 onwards they have been known as simply the Commonwealth Games. Few countries can take pride in being the birthplace of a major global multisport competition. But Canada can! There have been 19 editions of this great event on three continents since 1930 (and four in our great country!).  And Canada has always done remarkably well!
 
While other Games around the globe have been founded on geographic or climatic factors such as the Asian, Pan Am, African Games and Winter Olympics, the Commonwealth Games has been founded on history. Unique characteristics of the Commonwealth Games include being the only Games which shares a common language. All athletes and officials can converse with each other in English, creating an atmosphere that has led to the Commonwealth Games being long known as the "Friendly Games".
 
The bonds of the Commonwealth Games help to encourage and support the pursuit of health and fitness in each of the 71 member nations and territories and provide an inspiration for youth to strive for excellence. 
 
 

PREVIOUS COMMONWEALTH GAMES

2014 Glasgow, Scotland:  There will be a lot more to the Glasgow 2014 Commonwealth Games than sport. On top of the 11 days of elite sporting competition, there will be live entertainment, cultural highlights, fanzones and big screens, street theatre and something happening on every corner. Famed the world over for great crowds, great atmosphere and putting on a great show, this will be Glasgow’s chance to do it on a record-breaking scale.  You simply have to be there to enjoy the spectacle of these great events.

Chef de Mission - Chantal Petitclerc
Canadian team flag bearer: Opening Ceremonies - Susan Natrass (Shooting)
Canadian team flag bearer: Closing Ceremonies - Sultana Frizell (Athletics)

Canadian team fun facts:
Team Size:    XXX Athletes = Male-XXX; Female-XXX
Youngest Athlete: 
Oldest Athlete:
Most Medals Won: 
Team Canada Photo Gallery

Canadian team media guide:  Athletics; Badminton; Boxing; Cycling; Diving; Field Hockey; Gymnastics; Judo; Lawn Bowls; Rugby 7s; Shooting; Squash; Swimming; Table Tennis; Triathlon; Weightlifting; Wrestling

Canadian Medals:   = Gold ; Silver ; Bronze 
Detailed Results


2010 Commonwealth Games - Delhi, India: Delhi, India, home to 14 million people, hosted the Commonwealth Games in October 2010. This was only the second time the Games were held in Asia.

Chef de Mission - Martha Deacon
Canadian team flag bearer: Opening Ceremonies - Ken Pereira (Field Hockey)
Canadian team flag bearer: Closing Ceremonies - Tara Whitten (Cycling)

Canadian team fun facts:
Team Size:    255 Athletes = Male-131; Female-124
Youngest Athlete: Tariq Dowers (16) Gymnastics; Anqi Luo (14) Table Tennis
Oldest Athlete: Wynn Payne (64) Shooting; Kin Hoi Josephine Lee (61) Lawn Bowls
Most Medals Won: Tara Whitten (1 gold; 3 bronze)

Canadian team media guide:  Archery; Athletics; Badminton; Boxing; Cycling; Diving; Field Hockey; Gymnastics; Lawn Bowls; Rugby 7s; Shooting; Squash; Swimming; Synchro; Table Tennis; Weightlifting; Wrestling

Canadian Medals:  76 = Gold 25; Silver 17; Bronze 33
Detailed Results


2006 Commonwealth Games - Melbourne, Australia:  Rhythmic gymnast Alexandra Orlando (Toronto, ON) tied a Commonwealth Games record by winning 6 gold medals. Diver Alexandre Despatie (Montreal, QC) got another sport milestone on his resume: winning Canada’s 400th gold medal in Commonwealth Games history.  For the first time, the Queen's Baton visited every Commonwealth nation and territory taking part in the Games.

Canadian Team Chef de Mission - Dr. Ross Outerbridge
Canadian team flag bearer: Opening Ceremonies - Chantal Petitclerc (Wheelchair Racing)
Canadian team flag bearer: Closing Ceremonies - Alexandra Orlando (Rhythmic Gym.)

Canadian team fun facts:
Team Size:
Youngest Athlete: Riley McCormick (15) Diving; Rachel Kemp (13) Diving
Oldest Athlete: John Rochon (65) Shooting; Lynn McElroy (63) Lawn Bowls
Most Medals Won: Alexandra Orlando (6 gold)

Canadian team media guide: Athletics; Badminton; Boxing; Cycling; Diving; Field Hockey; Gymnastics; Lawn Bowls; Rugby 7's; Shooting; Squash; Swimming; Synchro Swim; Table Tennis; Triathlon; Weightlifing

Canadian Medals:  87 = Gold 26; Silver 30; Bronze 31
Detailed Results


2002 Commonwealth Games - Manchester, England
The XVII Commonwealth Games hosted in the city of Manchester, was the largest in the history of the Commonwealth Games with all 72 nations and territories participating. Also for the first time in the Games history, actually at any multi-sport event in the world, a number of full medal events for elite athletes with a disability (EAD) were included in a fully integrated sports programme.

Canadian Team Chef de Mission - Marg McGregor
Canadian team flag bearer: Opening Ceremonies - Daniel Igali (Wrestling)
Canadian team flag bearer: Closing Ceremonies - Lori-Ann Muenzer (Cycling)

Canadian team fun facts:
Team Size:
Youngest Athlete: Alexadre Déspatie (17) Diving; Kylie Stone (15) Gymnastics
Oldest Athlete: Frank Kurenda (58) Shooting; Vivian Berkeley (61) Lawn Bowls

Canadian Medals: 117 = Gold 31; Silver 41; Bronze 45
Detailed Results


1998 Commonwealth Games - Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
For the first time ever, the Commonwealth Games were held in Asia. The XVI Games, held in Kuala Lumpur were the first Games to feature team sports - an overwhelming success!  A new record of 70 nations and territories participated in the Games.
Canada's mascot, Canoose, also made his debut and ran in the 100m mascot run.

Canadian Team Chef de Mission - Margie Schuett
Canadian team flag bearer: Opening Ceremonies - Marianne Limpert (Swim)
Canadian team flag bearer: Closing Ceremonies - Mike Strange (Boxing)

Canadian team fun facts:
Team Size:
Youngest Athlete: Alexadre Déspatie (13) Diving; Crystal Gilmore (15) Gymnastics
Oldest Athlete: John Rochon (57) Shooting; Doreen Creaney (63) Lawn Bowls

Canadian Medals:  99 = Gold 30; Silver 31; Bronze 38
Detailed Results


1994 Commonwealth Games - Victoria, Canada
The XV Commonwealth Games were held in Canada for the fourth time. The end of apartheid saw the return of South Africa to the Commonwealth Games and ensured that the era of threatened boycotts was over.  The 1994 Commonwealth Games logo was a celebration ribbon - embodied the energy, festivity and motion of the Games. The sweep of the red, white and blue ribbon represented the Roman Numbers XV, and the V represented both Victoria and Victory.  The mascot symbolised fun, festivities and the host city's popular culture as a tradition at major sporting events. "Klee Wych", the Killer Whale, was symbolic of the intelligent sociable and graceful animals native to Canadian waters, and especially associated with the beauty and vitality of British Columbia. The name Klee Wych was picked after a competition and it is broadly translated as "the laughing one" in Nuu-chah Nulth peoples' language.

Canadian Team Chef de Mission - Judy Kent
Canadian team flag bearer: Opening Ceremonies - Angela Chalmers (Athletics)
Canadian team flag bearer: Closing Ceremonies -  Michel Dion (Shooting)

Canadian team fun facts:
Team Size:
Youngest Athlete: Jason Caswell (15) Shooting; Jaime Hill (15) Gymnastics
Oldest Athlete: Ronald Jones (64) Lawn Bowls; Leona Peterson (60) Lawn Bowls

Canadian Medals:  129 = Gold 40; Silver 42; Bronze 49
Detailed Results


1990 Commonwealth Games - Auckland, New Zealand
Thankfully, the threatened boycott gave way to a new positive spirit of co-operation far more in keeping with the image of “The Friendly Games” and a new record of 55 nations participated.  The XIV Commonwealth Games were the third to be hosted by New Zealand and Auckland’s second.

Canadian Team General Team Manager - Jim Daly
Canadian team flag bearer: Opening Ceremonies - Tom Ponting (Swimming)
Canadian team flag bearer: Closing Ceremonies  -  Mike Smith (Decathlon)

Canadian team fun facts:
Team Size:
Youngest Athlete: Peter Ogilvie (17) Athletics; Janet Morin (14) Gymnastics
Oldest Athlete: Sandy Peden (55) Shooting; Tina Reimer (65) Lawn Bowls
Most Commonwealth Games Attended: John Primrose (5th)Shooting;

Canadian Medals:  113 = Gold 35; Silver 41; Bronze 37
Detailed Results


1986 Commonwealth Games - Edinburgh, Scotland
After nearly two decades successfully averting political stay-aways and protests because of apartheid and sanction-busting sports tours to South Africa, the XIII Games, the second to be staged at Edinburgh, was to become known as “the Boycott Games”. Sadly, despite there being so many fond memories of the Scottish hospitality offered in 1970, 32 Commonwealth nations decided that they could not attend, because of their opposition to apartheid in sports.  Twenty-six nations did attend the second Edinburgh Games.

Canadian Team General Team Manager - Jim Daly
Canadian team flag bearer: Opening Ceremonies - Ben Johnson (Athletics)
Canadian team flag bearer: Closing Ceremonies -  Sharon Bowes (Shooting)

Canadian team fun facts:
Youngest Athlete: Turlough O'Hare (17) Swimming; Allison Higson (13) Swimming
Oldest Athlete: Harold Willsie (58) Shooting; Nell Hunter (71) Lawn Bowls

Canadian Medals:  116 = Gold 51; Silver 34; Bronze 31
Detailed Results


1982 Commonwealth Games - Brisbane, Australia
Once again, a boycott was avoided and the sun shone throughout the duration of the XII Games.  The 1982 Commonwealth Games mascot was a kangaroo named Matilda, and proved to be one of the most successful parts of the marketing program for the Games.  It was simple, but uniquely Australian. Matilda was popular all around the world.

Canadian Team General Team Manager - Allan Fitzpatrick
Canadian team flag bearer: Opening Ceremonies - John Primrose (Shooting)
Canadian team flag bearer: Closing Ceremonies -  Alex Baumann (Swimming)

Canadian team fun facts:
Youngest Athlete: Alain Metellus (17) Athletics; Donna McGinnis (14) Swimming
Oldest Athlete: Ron Jones (52) Lawn Bowls; Agnes Bowlby (61) Lawn Bowls

Canadian Medals:  82 = Gold 26; Silver 23; Bronze 33
Detailed Results


1978 Commonwealth Games - Edmonton, Canada
The XI Games was the first to bear the current day name of the Commonwealth Games. Edmonton organisers had to walk a careful tightrope in the lead up to the Games to ensure that there was no repeat of the African nations boycott of the 1976 Montreal Olympics caused by a New Zealand rugby tour of South Africa.  The 1978 Commonwealth Games mascot was Keyano. The mascot represented the Swan Hills Grizzly Bear, native to Alberta, Canada, and found only in the Swan Hills, a heavily-forested mountain region of North Alberta.  It is one of North America's largest bears and, at maturity, can weigh more than 400 kg. Its fur is a medium-brown colour and is long and shaggy.  ‘Keyano’ is a Cree Indian word meaning ‘unity and brotherhood’, and appropriately describes the Friendly Games.

Canadian team flag bearer:  Opening Ceremonies - Russ Prior (Weightlifting)
Canadian team flag bearer:  Closing Ceremonies -  Ray Takahashi (Wrestling)

Canadian team fun facts:
Most Medals Won: Male - Graham Smith (6 gold)Swimming

Canadian Medals:  109 = Gold 45; Silver 31; Bronze 33
Detailed Results


1974 British Commonwealth Games - Christchurch, New Zealand
Following the massacre of Israeli athletes at the 1972 Munich Olympics, the X Games at Christchurch was the first multi-sport event to place the safety of participants and spectators as its uppermost requirement. Security guards surrounded the athlete’s village and there was an exceptionally high-profile police presence.

  • Canadian team flag bearer:  Opening Ceremonies - Jamie Paulson (Badminton)
  • Canadian team flag bearer:  Closing Ceremonies -  Jules Sobrian (Shooting)
  • Canadian Medals: 62 = Gold 25; Silver 19; Bronze 18
  • Detailed Results

1970 British Commonwealth Games - Edinburgh, Scotland
The IX Games in Edinburgh will be remembered for a number of firsts:  first time that metric distances and electronic photo-finish technology were employed and the first time that HM Queen Elizabeth II attended in her capacity as Head of the Commonwealth.

  • Canadian team flag bearer:  Opening Ceremonies - Ralph Hutton (Swimming)
  • Canadian team flag bearer:  Closing Ceremonies -  * Not Available
  • Canadian Medals:  66 = Gold 18; Silver 24; Bronze 24
  • Detailed Results

1966 British Empire & Commonwealth Games - Kingston, Jamaica
With the British Empire formally ended, the Kingston, Jamaica Games became the VIII British Commonwealth Games. There was worry amongst the larger nations that Jamaica’s infrastructure would not be able to successfully deliver the Games – but Kingston proved us wrong!

  • Canadian team flag bearer:  Opening Ceremonies - Bill Crothers (Athletics)
  • Canadian team flag bearer:  Closing Ceremonies -  * Not Available
  • Canadian Medals:  57 = Gold 14; Silver 20; Bronze 23
  • Detailed Results

1962 British Empire & Commonwealth Games - Perth, Australia
The VII Commonwealth Games are remembered for their “heat, dust and glory”. The day before the Perth Games opened the temperature was an expected 80 degrees Fahrenheit, but the heat was measured at 105 degrees at the opening ceremony in the new Perry Lakes Stadium the following day and such extremes persisted throughout the Games’ duration. In the previous 65 years, only 10 100 degree plus days had been recorded in Perth. Australian soldiers were pressed into action, ferrying water to competing athletes.

  • Canadian team flag bearer:  Opening Ceremonies - Gordon Dickson (Athletics)
  • Canadian team flag bearer:  Closing Ceremonies -  * Not Available
  • Canadian Medals:  31 = Gold 4; Silver 12; Bronze 15
  • Detailed Results

1958 British Empire & Commonwealth Games - Cardiff, Wales
The VI Games marked the largest sporting event ever held in Wales and it was the smallest country ever to host a British Empire and Commonwealth Games. Cardiff had to wait 12 years longer than originally scheduled to become host of the Games, as the 1946 event was cancelled because of World War II.  The Cardiff Games were to be South Africa’s last until their post-apartheid return to the Games in 1994. A number of objections against South Africa took place in Cardiff because their team had been selected on the basis of race and colour rather than ability. South Africa subsequently withdrew from the Commonwealth in 1961 for 30 years.

  • Canadian team flag bearer:  Opening Ceremonies - Doug Clement (Athletics)
  • Canadian team flag bearer:  Closing Ceremonies -  Wayne Pretti (Rowing)
  • Canadian Medals:  27 = Gold 1; Silver 10; Bronze 16
  • Detailed Results

1954 British Empire & Commonwealth Games - Vancouver, Canada
Vancouver set new standards in organisation and presentation of not only Commonwealth Games but all multi-sport Games of the times.  The athletes oath was taken by a Canadian, Bill Parnell, which for the first time would reflect the involvement of Commonwealth nations, outside of the British Empire.  The Games put Vancouver on the world stage with The ‘Miracle Mile’.  Both Roger Bannister of England (Gold Medallist) and John Landy of Australia (Silver Medallist) ran the mile in under four minutes, in an event that was televised live across the world for the first time.

  • Canadian team flag bearer:  Opening Ceremonies - Gerard Gratton (Weightlifting)
  • Canadian team flag bearer:  Closing Ceremonies -  * Not Available
  • Canadian Medals:  43 = Gold 9; Silver 20; Bronze 14
  • Detailed Results

1950 British Empire Games - Auckland, New Zealand
World War II interrupted the staging of the British Empire Games scheduled for 1942 and 1946, however the enthusiasm from within the British Empire to continue what was started in 1930 was strong.  The IV Games were awarded to New Zealand, and held in the nation’s largest city, Auckland.

  • Canadian team flag bearer:  Opening Ceremonies - * Not Available
  • Canadian team flag bearer:  Closing Ceremonies -  * Not Available
  • Canadian Medals:  30 = Gold 8; Silver 9; Bronze 13
  • Detailed Results

1938 British Empire Games - Sydney, Australia
Held in the southern hemisphere for the first time, the III Games opening ceremony took place at the famed Sydney Cricket Ground in front of 40,000 spectators.

  • Canadian team flag bearer:  Opening Ceremonies - * Not Available
  • Canadian team flag bearer:  Closing Ceremonies - *  Not Available
  • Canadian Medals:  44 = Gold 13; Silver 16; Bronze 15
  • Detailed Results

1934 British Empire Games - London, England
This was the last time that Newfoundland took part independent of Canada. A highlight of the 1934 Games was the inclusion of events for women in athletics.  Originally scheduled for Johannesburg, South Africa, the II Games were hosted by London, in order to avoid a political crisis over South Africa's 'Apartheid' policy and its implications on visiting Commonwealth athletes and officials.

  • Canadian team flag bearer:  Opening Ceremonies - * Not Available
  • Canadian team flag bearer:  Closing Ceremonies - *  Not Available
  • Canadian Medals:  49 = Gold 15; Silver 25; Bronze 9
  • Detailed Results

1930 British Empire Games - Hamilton, Canada
The city of Hamilton proved a gracious first host of the Commonwealth Games. The Games then were called the British Empire Games. The athletes’ village was the Prince of Wales School next to the Civic Stadium, where the competitors slept two dozen to a classroom.  Despite missing some basic comforts, the participants were unanimous in their praise for the Games and Hamilton’s hospitality. The Hamilton Games ran at a cost of $97,973.00
 

Canadian team flag bearer:  Opening Ceremonies - Percy Williams (Athletics)
Canadian team flag bearer:  Closing Ceremonies -  * Not Available
Canadian Medals:  54 = Gold 20; Silver 15; Bronze 19
Detailed Results